Elsewhere on the internet...

The League of Reason has some social media accounts! You can find us on Facebook or on Twitter for some interesting links and things.

A math Problem

Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 3 of 9
 [ 171 posts ] 
A math Problem
Author Message
he_who_is_nobodyBloggerUser avatarPosts: 3347Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:36 amLocation: Albuquerque, New Mexico Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

Grumpy Santa wrote:
leroy wrote:2 mistakes.

1 the fact that the series of real numbers is infinite, does not mean that I have the ability to choose from an infinite set of numbers, I can only choose from the numbers that I can imagine. I can only choose from the numbers that exist in my mind (a finite number)

2 I am more likely to imagine some numbers than others, I am more likely to choose 7 than to choose 7312004874512...


And yet you just chose both...


Actually, even though he said he was more likely to choose seven, he did not choose seven (that was hackenslash's example). Thus, he actually did only pick 7312004874512 randomly; which also proves hackenslash's point regardless of how much dandan/leroy whines about it.
_BONES AND FOSSILS = LOVE_
(_'--------------------'_)
(_.--------------------._)
Tue Apr 11, 2017 6:31 pm
YIM WWW
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

he_who_is_nobody wrote:
Actually, even though he said he was more likely to choose seven, he did not choose seven (that was hackenslash's example). Thus, he actually did only pick 7312004874512 randomly; which also proves hackenslash's point regardless of how much dandan/leroy whines about it.



I never said that I will always pick 7 nor that I would never ever pick 7312004874512


all I am saying is that some numbers are more likely to be imagined than others, for example 1 digit numbers are more likely to be imagined than a 13 digit number.


if you ask 1,000 individuals to choose any number, you will have more individuals that pick a number with 1 digit, like 7 than a number with 13 digits like 7312004874512,

obviously you agree with this, but you pretend not to agree because you are just a 12yo troll. your friend hackenslash was simply wrong, the act of imagining a number is not a random event, some numbers are more likely to be imagined than others, you should correct him instead of pretending that you agree with him and disagree with me.




hackenslash wont lisen to me, his only hope to be corrected and no longer committing the same mistake is if you (or someone else worthy of his trust) corrects him
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Tue Apr 11, 2017 6:50 pm
thenexttodiePosts: 799Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:59 pm Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

hackenslash wrote:Silly me for crediting you with a reasonably-functioning imagination.



:lol:
“..the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.” Tolstoy
Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:20 pm
hackenslashLime TordUser avatarPosts: 2393Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 3:43 pm Gender: Cake

Post Re: A math Problem

leroy wrote:Given that PI has an infinite number of integers after the decimal point.


No it doesn't. You've simply latched onto the word 'integer' because somebody else used it, and now it's your word of the week. If you don't know what a word means, you should look it up before using it, because you'll always get caught.
Tue Apr 11, 2017 11:27 pm
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

hackenslash wrote:
leroy wrote:Given that PI has an infinite number of integers after the decimal point.


No it doesn't. You've simply latched onto the word 'integer' because somebody else used it, and now it's your word of the week. If you don't know what a word means, you should look it up before using it, because you'll always get caught.



However the difference between you and I is that I have no problem in admitting that I made a mistake.


hackenslash wrote:
events with a zero probability happen all the time


how long will it take you to admit that this statement is wrong,(not to mention incoherent and absurd) or at least how long will it take you to admit that your trivial proof was wrong?
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Wed Apr 12, 2017 1:44 pm
he_who_is_nobodyBloggerUser avatarPosts: 3347Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:36 amLocation: Albuquerque, New Mexico Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

leroy wrote:
he_who_is_nobody wrote:
Actually, even though he said he was more likely to choose seven, he did not choose seven (that was hackenslash's example). Thus, he actually did only pick 7312004874512 randomly; which also proves hackenslash's point regardless of how much dandan/leroy whines about it.



I never said that I will always pick 7 nor that I would never ever pick 7312004874512


all I am saying is that some numbers are more likely to be imagined than others, for example 1 digit numbers are more likely to be imagined than a 13 digit number.


Than what you are saying is irrelevant to hackenslash's point. Please work on your reading comprehension.

leroy wrote:if you ask 1,000 individuals to choose any number, you will have more individuals that pick a number with 1 digit, like 7 than a number with 13 digits like 7312004874512,


Citation needed.

leroy wrote:obviously you agree with this, but you pretend not to agree because you are just a 12yo troll. your friend hackenslash was simply wrong, the act of imagining a number is not a random event, some numbers are more likely to be imagined than others, you should correct him instead of pretending that you agree with him and disagree with me.


I love how you still think you are a mind reader while at the same time displaying the worst reading comprehension I have ever seen. Beyond that, how could hackenslash be wrong when you picking 7312004874512 randomly proves him correct? Care to calculate those odds and prove him right?

leroy wrote:hackenslash wont lisen to me, his only hope to be corrected and no longer committing the same mistake is if you (or someone else worthy of his trust) corrects him


Why would someone correct him when he is not wrong (and you demonstrated it yourself)? How about instead of mindlessly disagreeing with hackenslash, you actually read what he is saying and learn something for once?
_BONES AND FOSSILS = LOVE_
(_'--------------------'_)
(_.--------------------._)
Wed Apr 12, 2017 5:04 pm
YIM WWW
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

he_who_is_nobody wrote:
Than what you are saying is irrelevant to hackenslash's point. Please work on your reading comprehension.



No it is not irrelevant, stop defending hackenslash, he said that me thinking in a number is a random event with an infinite pool of options, since this is clearly wrong then please stop defending him

leroy wrote:if you ask 1,000 individuals to choose any number, you will have more individuals that pick a number with 1 digit, like 7 than a number with 13 digits like 7312004874512,


Citation needed.


:lol: :lol: :lol: just a personal guess. and you don't think otherwise, you are just pretending to do so because for some reason you feel that you should always help your atheist friends even when they are wrong.



I love how you still think you are a mind reader while at the same time displaying the worst reading comprehension I have ever seen. Beyond that, how could hackenslash be wrong when you picking 7312004874512 randomly proves him correct? Care to calculate those odds and prove him right?


the burden proof is on hackenslash, he is the one who believes that each number has the same probability to be imagined, even if 7312004874512 where more probable than 7 hackenslash would still be wrong.

ohhh, I am sorry I forgot that hackenslash is an atheist and that atheist don't have to prove their assertions.


Why would someone correct him when he is not wrong (and you demonstrated it yourself)? How about instead of mindlessly disagreeing with hackenslash, you actually read what he is saying and learn something for once?


ok so given that you are affirming that hackenslash is correct you are affirming that events with zero possibility can happen ...........see what happened? your sick obsession of defending your atheist friends at all cost is forcing you to grant an incoherent statement,

hackenslash would argue that the probability of me thinking in the number 7 is zero why don't you stop your hypocrisy and explain hackenslash why is he wrong.


events with zero possibility can happen


If I would have made this statement you would have corrected me, and probably even insulted and ridiculed me, so why don't you do the same with hackenslash?
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Wed Apr 12, 2017 6:50 pm
he_who_is_nobodyBloggerUser avatarPosts: 3347Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:36 amLocation: Albuquerque, New Mexico Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

leroy wrote:
he_who_is_nobody wrote:
Than what you are saying is irrelevant to hackenslash's point. Please work on your reading comprehension.



No it is not irrelevant, stop defending hackenslash, he said that me thinking in a number is a random event with an infinite pool of options, since this is clearly wrong then please stop defending him


Did you not have a infinite pool of options? What limited you? Again, do the calculation and tell us what the odds were for you to come up with 7312004874512 at random. Once you do that, you will see that hackenslash is correct.

leroy wrote:
leroy wrote:if you ask 1,000 individuals to choose any number, you will have more individuals that pick a number with 1 digit, like 7 than a number with 13 digits like 7312004874512,


Citation needed.


:lol: :lol: :lol: just a personal guess. and you don't think otherwise, you are just pretending to do so because for some reason you feel that you should always help your atheist friends even when they are wrong.


First you claimed something as fact, now it is just a personal opinion. One that for whatever reason (those mind reading classes?) you think I share. I do not. I do not know what would be more likely.

leroy wrote:
I love how you still think you are a mind reader while at the same time displaying the worst reading comprehension I have ever seen. Beyond that, how could hackenslash be wrong when you picking 7312004874512 randomly proves him correct? Care to calculate those odds and prove him right?


the burden proof is on hackenslash, he is the one who believes that each number has the same probability to be imagined, even if 7312004874512 where more probable than 7 hackenslash would still be wrong.


Incorrect. That is not what hackenslash said. Stop creating straw men to burn and work on your reading comprehension.

leroy wrote:ohhh, I am sorry I forgot that hackenslash is an atheist and that atheist don't have to prove their assertions.


Yet he already did.

hackenslash wrote:Pick any number on the real number line. Let's say, for example, that you choose the number 7. The probability of choosing that number at random is zero. How? Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one.

[emphasis added]


Again, work on your reading comprehension, because this is just getting sad.

leroy wrote:
Why would someone correct him when he is not wrong (and you demonstrated it yourself)? How about instead of mindlessly disagreeing with hackenslash, you actually read what he is saying and learn something for once?


ok so given that you are affirming that hackenslash is correct you are affirming that events with zero possibility can happen ...........see what happened? your sick obsession of defending your atheist friends at all cost is forcing you to grant an incoherent statement,


How can it be incoherent when you randomly picking 7312004874512 proves it? Again, I await for you to do the math and prove him right. Anything short of that is just grandstanding.

leroy wrote:hackenslash would argue that the probability of me thinking in the number 7 is zero why don't you stop your hypocrisy and explain hackenslash why is he wrong.


As hackenslash said:

hackenslash wrote:Pick any number on the real number line. Let's say, for example, that you choose the number 7. The probability of choosing that number at random is zero. How? Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one.

[emphasis added]


Work on your reading comprehension, this is getting sad.

leroy wrote:
events with zero possibility can happen


If I would have made this statement you would have corrected me, and probably even insulted and ridiculed me, so why don't you do the same with hackenslash?


You are probably right that I would have corrected you on that, and then hackenslash would have came and pointed out:

hackenslash wrote:Pick any number on the real number line. Let's say, for example, that you choose the number 7. The probability of choosing that number at random is zero. How? Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one.

[emphasis added]


And I would have accept that I was mistaken to believe you were wrong. Again, do the math and work on your reading comprehension, because this is just getting sad.
_BONES AND FOSSILS = LOVE_
(_'--------------------'_)
(_.--------------------._)
Thu Apr 13, 2017 5:01 pm
YIM WWW
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

he_who_is_nobody wrote:Did you not have a infinite pool of options? What limited you? Again, do the calculation and tell us what the odds were for you to come up with 7312004874512 at random. Once you do that, you will see that hackenslash is correct.


well for one thing 7312004874512 is a result of me typing random numbers in my keybord, given that I have limited time and my pomputer limited power, I could have not typed a number with trillions of digits. ...........there are some numbers that I could have not typed.

I can think on many other limitations that would prevent an infinite pool of options, but this one example is sufficient to prove my point.

First you claimed something as fact, now it is just a personal opinion. One that for whatever reason (those mind reading classes?) you think I share. I do not. I do not know what would be more likely.


hackenslash and no you are the ones who made the statement, you are the ones who are claiming that each number has the same probability to be imagined. you are the ones who are suppose to provide the proof.

Again, work on your reading comprehension


we have been there before, given that I have bad reading comprehension, why cant you provide simple and direct answers?

do you affirm that piking 7 and piking 7312004874512 have the same probability, when asking someone to pick any number?

do you affirm that the probability is zero in both cases?

thes are yes or no questions, please just answer yes or no, I might misunderstand any other answer so please limit your answers to a simple yes or no

and given that you are so good in reading comprehension, based on what hackenslash said, how do you think he would answer to those questions?




How can it be incoherent when you randomly picking 7312004874512 proves it?


me picking 7312004874512 proves that the probabilities of picking 7312004874512 are not zero.





You are probably right that I would have corrected you on that, and then hackenslash would have came and pointed out:

hackenslash wrote:Pick any number on the real number line. Let's say, for example, that you choose the number 7. The probability of choosing that number at random is zero. How? Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one.

[emphasis added][

And I would have accept that I was mistaken to believe you were wrong. Again, do the math and work on your reading comprehension, because this is just getting sad.


But if I would have made the statement, instead of hackenslash, you would have explained to me that just because something can be represented mathematically, that doesn't mean its possible or even coherent,

for example
if you travel at -10 miles / hour (note that 10 is a negative number) for 200 miles you would travel for -20 hours which means that you would travel -20 hours to the past.

you can represent this mathematically Time = distance/speed

Time = 200/-10

Time = -20


but that doesn't mean that it is possible to travel back in time.


you would have explained to me that both the idea of an infinite pool of options and the idea of a negative speed are logically incoherent (or at least impossible) and the fact that you can represent them mathematically does not change that fact.
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Thu Apr 13, 2017 7:21 pm
Dragan GlasContributorUser avatarPosts: 2959Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:55 amLocation: Ireland Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

Greetings,

Leroy, think of it in terms of betting on horses in a race.

If there are six horses, then there is a 1-in-6 chance of you picking a horse on which to bet. Agreed?

Just because there's an infinite number of horses in the race doesn't change the fact that there's a 1-in-infinity chance of you betting on a horse.

And 1 divided by infinity is zero.

Thus, even though there's zero probability of you choosing a horse on which to bet, that's exactly what happens - you choose a horse.

Hence, your new signature is correct.

Earlier, you contradicted yourself - and this fact - when you stated that even if you had an infinite number of attempts you wouldn't succeed. Actually, if you had an infinite number of tries, you're bound to succeed.

Kindest regards,

James
Image
"The Word of God is the Creation we behold and it is in this Word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man."
The Age Of Reason
Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:17 am
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

Dragan Glas wrote:Greetings,

Leroy, think of it in terms of betting on horses in a race.

If there are six horses, then there is a 1-in-6 chance of you picking a horse on which to bet. Agreed?

Just because there's an infinite number of horses in the race doesn't change the fact that there's a 1-in-infinity chance of you betting on a horse.

And 1 divided by infinity is zero.

Thus, even though there's zero probability of you choosing a horse on which to bet, that's exactly what happens - you choose a horse.

Hence, your new signature is correct.

Earlier, you contradicted yourself - and this fact - when you stated that even if you had an infinite number of attempts you wouldn't succeed. Actually, if you had an infinite number of tries, you're bound to succeed.

Kindest regards,

James


granted the math is correct And 1 divided by infinity is zero, however just because you can show something mathematically doesn't prove that it is possible or even logically coherent in the real world.


you can represent mathematically a negative time, a negative distance or 100.65 space dimensions but none of that proves these concepts are even possible. .......the idea of an infinite number of horses is logically incoherent or at least impossible.


Hence, your new signature is correct


ok so

events with zero possibility happen all the time


can you provide 1 example, one real life example of a race with an infinite number of horses, or some other example with an infinite number of options? or would you agree that examples with infinite options only exist in the hypothetical world?


note, when a human or a computer select a number randomly, they don't select the number within an infinite pool of options, even a supercomputer has limited memory and can only hold an finite amount of numbers to chose from. so even if I grant that the series of real numbers is infinite it is still impossible to chose from an infinite pool of options.
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Fri Apr 14, 2017 2:12 pm
Dragan GlasContributorUser avatarPosts: 2959Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:55 amLocation: Ireland Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

Greetings,

The fact that any event of which you can think - such as the chance that an atom in your right hand comes from a star which went supernova sometime in the past - has a 1-in-infinity probability of occurring is enough of an example to show that events with zero probability can occur.

Kindest regards,

James
Image
"The Word of God is the Creation we behold and it is in this Word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man."
The Age Of Reason
Fri Apr 14, 2017 3:24 pm
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

Dragan Glas wrote:Greetings,

The fact that any event of which you can think - such as the chance that an atom in your right hand comes from a star which went supernova sometime in the past - has a 1-in-infinity probability of occurring is enough of an example to show that events with zero probability can occur.

Kindest regards,

James



the atom could have been in my right hand or in some other place, however there is a finite amount of places where an atom could have been. therefore in your example you are not dividing 1 / Infinity
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Fri Apr 14, 2017 5:58 pm
Dragan GlasContributorUser avatarPosts: 2959Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:55 amLocation: Ireland Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

Greetings,

leroy wrote:
Dragan Glas wrote:Greetings,

The fact that any event of which you can think - such as the chance that an atom in your right hand comes from a star which went supernova sometime in the past - has a 1-in-infinity probability of occurring is enough of an example to show that events with zero probability can occur.

Kindest regards,

James

the atom could have been in my right hand or in some other place, however there is a finite amount of places where an atom could have been. therefore in your example you are not dividing 1 / Infinity

It's not the number of places it can be that matters - vast as that is - it's the cumulative probability that makes it a 1-in-infinity event.

What are the odds that a given atom from a given star, which subsequently went supernova, ended up in the disc, which formed our solar system, which eventually ended up in a specific point in your right hand (versus anywhere else).

Bear in mind that the original star from which it came was also the result of a supernova, etc, which is all part of the cumulative probability.

Kindest regards,

James
Image
"The Word of God is the Creation we behold and it is in this Word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man."
The Age Of Reason
Sat Apr 15, 2017 1:42 am
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

Dragan Glas wrote:It's not the number of places it can be that matters - vast as that is - it's the cumulative probability that makes it a 1-in-infinity event.

What are the odds that a given atom from a given star, which subsequently went supernova, ended up in the disc, which formed our solar system, which eventually ended up in a specific point in your right hand (versus anywhere else).

Bear in mind that the original star from which it came was also the result of a supernova, etc, which is all part of the cumulative probability.

Kindest regards,

James


given that you are suppose to be a determinist, you are suppose to believe that the probability of that even is 100%.............a none determinist would say that the probabilities are very small but not infinitely small.
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Sat Apr 15, 2017 6:43 pm
Dragan GlasContributorUser avatarPosts: 2959Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:55 amLocation: Ireland Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

Greetings,

leroy wrote:
Dragan Glas wrote:It's not the number of places it can be that matters - vast as that is - it's the cumulative probability that makes it a 1-in-infinity event.

What are the odds that a given atom from a given star, which subsequently went supernova, ended up in the disc, which formed our solar system, which eventually ended up in a specific point in your right hand (versus anywhere else).

Bear in mind that the original star from which it came was also the result of a supernova, etc, which is all part of the cumulative probability.

Kindest regards,

James


given that you are suppose to be a determinist, you are suppose to believe that the probability of that even is 100%.............a none determinist would say that the probabilities are very small but not infinitely small.

Determinism does not mean pre-determined.

Given the sheer number of chemical reactions that have occurred since the Big Bang until a specific atom ends up in a specific position in your right hand, the probability of it happening is zero.

Kindest regards,

James
Image
"The Word of God is the Creation we behold and it is in this Word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man."
The Age Of Reason
Sun Apr 16, 2017 2:39 pm
he_who_is_nobodyBloggerUser avatarPosts: 3347Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 1:36 amLocation: Albuquerque, New Mexico Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

leroy wrote:
he_who_is_nobody wrote:Did you not have a infinite pool of options? What limited you? Again, do the calculation and tell us what the odds were for you to come up with 7312004874512 at random. Once you do that, you will see that hackenslash is correct.


well for one thing 7312004874512 is a result of me typing random numbers in my keybord, given that I have limited time and my pomputer limited power, I could have not typed a number with trillions of digits. ...........there are some numbers that I could have not typed.


Thus, you were limited in that moment. What would limit one in all cases?

leroy wrote:I can think on many other limitations that would prevent an infinite pool of options, but this one example is sufficient to prove my point.


I would bet that all those limitations you came up with would limit someone in that moment and not one of them would be able to count for a real limitation on the real numbers.

leroy wrote:
First you claimed something as fact, now it is just a personal opinion. One that for whatever reason (those mind reading classes?) you think I share. I do not. I do not know what would be more likely.


hackenslash and no you are the ones who made the statement, you are the ones who are claiming that each number has the same probability to be imagined. you are the ones who are suppose to provide the proof.


You mean like this?

hackenslash wrote:Pick any number on the real number line. Let's say, for example, that you choose the number 7. The probability of choosing that number at random is zero. How? Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one.

[emphasis added]


Oh, and look you later agreed that he was correct:

leroy wrote:granted the math is correct And 1 divided by infinity is zero...


I guess you have been working on that reading comprehension. I am proud of you.

leroy wrote:
Again, work on your reading comprehension


we have been there before, given that I have bad reading comprehension, why cant you provide simple and direct answers?


Hackenslash has, and right above you agreed we did. See how reading comprehension can help move a conversation forward?

leroy wrote:do you affirm that piking 7 and piking 7312004874512 have the same probability, when asking someone to pick any number?


Yes, "Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one."

leroy wrote:do you affirm that the probability is zero in both cases?


Yes, "Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one."

leroy wrote:thes are yes or no questions, please just answer yes or no, I might misunderstand any other answer so please limit your answers to a simple yes or no


Yet, you already agreed that hackenslash was correct before I answered yes to those.

leroy wrote:and given that you are so good in reading comprehension, based on what hackenslash said, how do you think he would answer to those questions?


Yes as well, "Because the reals are infinite, and any number divided by infinity is zero, hance the probability of choosing 7, or indeed any other number, is exactly zero, yet the probability of choosing some number is exactly one."

leroy wrote:
How can it be incoherent when you randomly picking 7312004874512 proves it?


me picking 7312004874512 proves that the probabilities of picking 7312004874512 are not zero.


Future dandan/leroy; care to correct past dandan/leroy?

leroy wrote:granted the math is correct And 1 divided by infinity is zero...


Thank you future dandan/leroy. Now if only past dandan/leroy had the reading comprehension skills you have, so much time would not be wasted.

leroy wrote:
You are probably right that I would have corrected you on that, and then hackenslash would have came and pointed out:

[...]

And I would have accept that I was mistaken to believe you were wrong. Again, do the math and work on your reading comprehension, because this is just getting sad.


But if I would have made the statement, instead of hackenslash, you would have explained to me that just because something can be represented mathematically, that doesn't mean its possible or even coherent,


More mind reading from dandan/leroy. You really need to get that refund from those classes.

leroy wrote:for example
if you travel at -10 miles / hour (note that 10 is a negative number) for 200 miles you would travel for -20 hours which means that you would travel -20 hours to the past.

you can represent this mathematically Time = distance/speed

Time = 200/-10

Time = -20


but that doesn't mean that it is possible to travel back in time.


you would have explained to me that both the idea of an infinite pool of options and the idea of a negative speed are logically incoherent (or at least impossible) and the fact that you can represent them mathematically does not change that fact.


When was it ever demonstrated that the real numbers were not infinite? If you can demonstrate that, you would have a point. I remember you failing to even understand what an infinite is, but you never came close to demonstrating that it is incoherent or impossible (logical or otherwise).

By the way, I love the new quote. Acknowledging that hackenslash is correct and accepting the correction is very honorable and something I did not expect from you.
_BONES AND FOSSILS = LOVE_
(_'--------------------'_)
(_.--------------------._)
Sun Apr 16, 2017 7:46 pm
YIM WWW
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

leroy wrote:
well for one thing 7312004874512 is a result of me typing random numbers in my keybord, given that I have limited time and my pomputer limited power, I could have not typed a number with trillions of digits. ...........there are some numbers that I could have not typed.



he_who_is_nobody wrote:Thus, you were limited in that moment. What would limit one in all cases?



In all cases I would have limitations, I will always have limited time, and my computer (or any computer) will always have limited power and limited memory.

so please accept your burden and provide an example that happens all the time of someone or something that choose from an infinite pool of option.

leroy wrote:
granted the math is correct And 1 divided by infinity is zero...


he_who_is_nobody wrote:I guess you have been working on that reading comprehension. I am proud of you



The fact that you can represent infinite options mathematically does not prove that it is possible or even coherent to have infinite options in the actual world, is there anything in this statement that you disagree with?

remember hackenslash is talking about events that happen all the time. we all agree that the formula is correct, the only point of disagreement is that I would argue that nothing in the real world represents that formula.......nothing in the real world has an infinite pool of options. And so for no one has ever provided an example from the real world that includes infinite options.


When was it ever demonstrated that the real numbers were not infinite? If you can demonstrate that, you would have a point. I remember you failing to even understand what an infinite is, but you never came close to demonstrating that it is incoherent or impossible (logical or otherwise).
[/quote]

why is it that atheist always what to scape their burden proof?

you are the one who is affirming that numbers are infinite, (consider that you are a nominalist)

you are the one wo affirms that it is possible to have infinite options

you are the one who affirms that it is possible to have an infinite number of something

of course with you I mean hackenslash, I am simply assuming that you share the same view on those 3 points, feel free to correct me and explain your actual views.


why should I grant any of those points if you haven't prove them?
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Sun Apr 16, 2017 10:50 pm
leroyPosts: 1795Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:30 pm

Post Re: A math Problem

Dragan Glas wrote:


Given the sheer number of chemical reactions that have occurred since the Big Bang until a specific atom ends up in a specific position in your right hand, the probability of it happening is zero.

Kindest regards,

James



well prove it, show me your math
"events with a zero probability happen all the time"
Sun Apr 16, 2017 10:54 pm
Steelmage99Posts: 174Joined: Thu May 28, 2015 9:43 am Gender: Male

Post Re: A math Problem

You make a lot of demands, Leroy.

How about you get to the point and explain what your......well, point...... is with your original post.
Blunder that theists make all the time;

Pretending to know what other people think.
Mon Apr 17, 2017 12:20 am
PreviousNext
Post new topic Reply to topic  Page 3 of 9
 [ 171 posts ] 
Return to Science & Mathematics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Trixie and 5 guests